9 best places to visit in Fiji

Pristine white sand beaches, aquamarine waters and a lush volcanic landscape – arriving in Fiji truly feels like you’ve discovered paradise.

This far-flung archipelago, made up of more than 300 islands, has a rich culture with delicious food and a joie-de-vivre attitude at its heart. Start planning your trip now with our shortlist of the best places to visit in this picture-perfect corner of the world.

1. Nadi

Best place for multicultural Fiji

If you’re flying into Fiji, you’ll see Nadi from the air. This pint-sized city is located just a short drive from the international airport and is a great spot to kick off your Fijian adventure. A mix of stores in a rainbow of colors lines the roads, with everything from electronics to handicrafts on offer. 

The covered market is a real treat for the senses, with an array of local produce on offer. Another must-visit spot in the city is the spectacular Sri Siva Subramaniya Hindu temple, which is located downtown at the southern end of the main road. This spectacular temple, the largest in the Pacific, features intricate carvings that could keep you captivated for days. This is a good place to start your holiday before making your way around Fiji.

Local tip: Before entering a Hindu temple, always seek permission and remove your shoes. Photography is generally acceptable outside the temple but don’t take photos inside – be respectful and put your camera away. 

2. Yasawa Islands

Best region for stunning scenery

Yasawa means «heaven» in Fijian and this string of islands is certainly heavenly. The archipelago, located in the northwest, comprises around 20 islands of varying size with palm-lined beaches, aquamarine waters and dramatic topography being the running theme. Despite their remote location, the majority of the islands are inhabited and many feature hotels.

The Yasawa Flyer ferry departs daily from Port Denarau Marina close to the airport and stops at more than 12 of the islands. South Sea Cruises also runs ferry services and excursions in the area.  

A couple embracing in the pool in Fiji as the sun sets behind them
Treat yourself to a little luxury in Fiji © jhorrocks / Getty Images

3. Nanuku Resort

Best place for ultimate luxury

Elevate your Fiji trip by booking into the blissful confines of the five-star Nanuku Resort. This award-winning hotel on the southern edge of Fiji’s main island makes for a dreamy setting, with villas and apartments enveloped by lush foliage and a 3.2km (2-mile) white sand beach fringing the property.

The rooms feature an attractive blend of modern and Fijian-styled interiors with amenities including private plunge pools and cinema rooms. The luxe experience continues when it comes to dining – the main restaurant serves up French cuisine with a Pacific twist and, for a special occasion, you can book a dining experience on the shores of the hotel’s private island or its cliffside perch. 

4. Denarau Island

Best place to stay for families 

Located 20 minutes from the airport, the small island of Denarau is a wonderful option for families – everything you need is on your doorstep. The outcrop, connected to the mainland via a bridge, has been developed into a luxury tourism spot complete with a state-of-the-art marina, five-star resorts, top-notch restaurants and an 18-hole golf course.

It’s an apartment hotel, with fully equipped kitchens, dining rooms and lounge areas. Other perks at the property include parking, a swimming pool, babysitting services, a cafe, a gym and a tour desk offering a wide range of day and multi-day trips. 

Planning tip: Fancy seeing more of the island and visiting other resorts? All aboard the unmissable Bula Bus – it’s the one with the thatched roof.

 

5. Kuata

Best island for perfect holiday shots  

Let your cares wash away with a stay on Kuata. This far-flung island, which is part of the Yasawa archipelago, makes for a heavenly retreat with just one hotel (the Barefoot Kuata Island), secluded beaches, secret caves and some great hiking trails.

The Barefoot resort, which has another location several islands away, features a scattering of luxury safari-style tented rooms and beachfront bures (traditional wood-and-straw huts); there are also dormitories if you’re traveling on a budget. Facilities include an open-air restaurant, a bar and a swimming pool complete with a hammock for some scenic holiday shots. The Yasawa Flyer ferry stops at the island as part of its route.

Detour: Hire a guide and head up Kuata’s volcanic summit climb. It’s a strenuous uphill walk but you’ll be rewarded with dramatic views. The best times to go are before sunrise and sunset (and not only because it’s cooler). 

An outdoor table at a restaurant overlooking the ocean as the sun sets
Enjoy incredible Fijian cuisine as the sun sets © courtneyk / Getty Images

6. Tukuni

Best for local cuisine 

Tuck into an array of mouth-watering dishes at Tukuni. This restaurant boasts a lofty setting overlooking a sweeping bay close to the city of Lautoka on the west coast of the main island and is a community-run operation with local farmers and fishermen supplying the ingredients.

Cooking takes place over an open fire and some popular dishes include ika tavu (smoked fish) and kokoda (marinated fish in coconut milk). There’s also a great selection of vegetarian dishes that include rourou (taro leaves). The Fijian experience doesn’t just extend to the food – the restaurant has a cozy, authentic feel, with handcrafted solid wood furnishings and woven palm wall panels setting the scene. 

Local tip: Fijian food offers a unique fusion of flavors with a Pacific take on cuisines from India and beyond. Staples such as sweet potato, cassava and taro are cooked with fish, vegetables and coconut; curries are generally milder and lighter here. 

7. Awakening Shark Dive

Best experience for adrenaline seekers

Put your fears to one side and buckle up for an adrenaline-pumping experience you’ll remember for the rest of your life. The Awakening Shark Dive experience is offered by the Barefoot Resort on Kuata Island and it brings you face to face with bull sharks. Experienced divers will lead you out to a spot close to the island where the sharks congregate thanks to efforts to restore the surrounding corals.

Kneel on the ocean floor and stay still while the sharks, which can be up to 3 meters (9.8ft) in length, slink in for a feeding session. Other shark species known to patrol the area include tiger, nurse, lemon, and silver tips. 

A mother and child hiking through the grass on one of the Yasawa Islands, Fiji
Hiking in the Fijian heat may not be easy but the views make it all worthwhile © chameleonseye / Getty Images

8. Mount Tomanivi

Best for epic views

Lace up your hiking boots and be prepared to break a sweat for a challenging climb up to the summit of Mount Tomanivi. This jungle-strewn peak on the main island is the highest point in Fiji, measuring 1324 meters (4343ft). The return trek takes around four hours but you’ll realize it was worth the effort as you take in the epic views of the surrounding emerald interior and the endless blue beyond.

Adventure company Talanoa Treks runs trips to Mount Tomanivi with local guides, and if you fancy a little more exertion, the company runs a «two peak challenge» with Fiji’s second-highest peak, Mount Batilamu, added to the agenda. 

9. Projects Abroad

Best for sustainable travel in Fiji

Help do your bit for the environment while in Fiji and sign up as a volunteer with Projects Abroad. This social enterprise, which has one location in Nadi and another close to the coast in Pacific Harbour, runs a range of volunteer projects that include shark conservation and beach clean-ups.

One of the business’ other focuses is mangrove restoration in a bid to protect natural habitats and stop coastal erosion. Many volunteers offset the carbon footprint of their flight by planting mangrove seedlings in the nursery and to date, more than 6 hectares (15 acres) of mangroves have been planted by Projects Abroad volunteers in Fiji since 2014.

Local tip: Like many other Pacific islands, Fiji is already feeling the effects of climate change. The village of Vunidogoloa was the first to move because of floods and erosion: 32 families relocated to higher land 2km (1.2 miles) away. 

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